Gaijin Smash

Sour Apples – Part VII

Posted in Blog by gaijinsmashnet on November 10, 2008

I can’t believe there’s a Part VII…
After a half-year of being miserable at the job, I finally gave my notice of resignation on a Tuesday at the beginning of August. I sent the email at the end of the day, so on Wednesday I went to work not really knowing what to expect. But for Wednesday as well as Thursday, it was business as usual. Neither the president nor the supervisor mentioned my notice of resignation, and my supervisor actually seemed to be avoiding me. I was fine with this – so long as they honored my final working day, I would have been content to just continue working and then no longer show up.
However, on Friday the president called me out for a private talk. He asked if I’d cooled down and changed my mind, which explains why neither of them had brought this up sooner. I explained that this wasn’t some hasty decision I’d made in the heat of passion – it had been building for months until I’d finally reached a breaking point. He then said that he didn’t want me to quit – he asked me to write up all the grievances I had with the company. The following Tuesday we would talk about it and he would make his plea to get me to stay. I agreed to write out my complaints at least, with the president telling me to hold nothing back.
We did meet the following Tuesday – I was expecting a talk within the company, perhaps with the supervisor included. Instead of that, we ended up going to an izakaya drinking bar (the one the president now owned), just the two of us. There, I presented him with my list of complaints I’d had over the past year. I tried to include everything that had frustrated me since the beginning of the year – getting ridiculed over errors, given tremendous amounts of work with no help and no acknowledgement that it was a lot of work, the supervisor’s constant riding of me…well, you’ve all read the story up until now.


The president read my list and seemed to sort of take it in, but there was one area he stopped at – where I listed being accused of not working hard, and even getting my pay cut for it. “You admitted that you were only working 20% of the time,” he said. “No,” I explained, “you went into that meeting convinced that I was only working 20% of the time, and I realized nothing I could say or do would change your mind. Certainly, I’d had my moments where I wasn’t exactly working, but it wasn’t the 80% you think. I only agreed to that to keep it from becoming an argument that went nowhere.” His response was, “Oh, I see,” and he kept reading.
After studying my list for a few minutes, he said that if I would “give the company another chance” he would work to change these issues. He also began to talk about lofty long-term goals, such as opening a branch office in America and having me be the manager of it – everything I’d been doing up until now was sort of training to get to that point.
He asked what I would do if I did quit. I hadn’t really thought about it – the immediate focus was the wedding that would take place next month. I said I supposed I would search for jobs for awhile, and if I found nothing good I’d have to go back to English teaching. He said that would be a tremendous waste – he saw great potential in me, which is why he didn’t want to let me just quit like that. I could even take the entire month of September off to plan for my wedding and to recuperate afterwards.
But there was still one big, burning issue on the table – my cut salary. I said that the idea that I hadn’t been working hard enough was a false assumption, and I didn’t like losing a big chunk of my paycheck because of it. I wanted it back. As Japanese people are prone to do, he gave an answer that deflected the question – he insinuated that he personally wanted to give me back my cut salary, but since this was something that was decided by the parent company, it was out of his hands.
The president told me that I didn’t have to give an answer right away. Take the weekend to think about it, and then give an answer next Monday. But before any deliberations were to be done, there was one other thing I needed to resolve if continuing to work there was even going to be an option – the supervisor. Actually, I wanted to resolve that issue regardless of whether I continued there or not. My mother taught me that sometimes, you just have to be the bigger man and take responsibility for things, regardless of who you think fired the first shot. I felt that I’d been wronged first by her actions at the beginning of the year, but in this bitter and pointless war of emotions, I hadn’t been perfect either. No matter what my reasons, wrong is wrong. So I sent an email to the supervisor later in the week, and we met privately as well.
During our talk, I noted that we’d had bad blood for quite a few months now. I said that I had my reasons for it, but ultimately that didn’t matter – some of my attitudes and responses were not suitable for a professional working environment, so I apologized. That was all I wanted to do, whether she accepted that or not, I’d done what I needed to and should have done.
However, she accepted that and also apologized as well, admitting that she’d been especially hard on me. She said that it was only because she expected so much of me – because she knows I can succeed, she’s especially tough on mistakes and failures, even little ones. She pointed out that she can be very hard on herself as well (somewhat true), but acknowledged that such an attitude can be discouraging and frustrating, so she promised to back off (and to her credit, she did for the remainder of the time that I was there).
She seemed very concerned about if I was going to continue the job or not. I told her I hadn’t decided yet, but this was something I needed to do regardless of whether I was there for another year or another day. We ended the discussion with a friendly handshake. I knew we probably couldn’t go back to being all smiles and what not, but at least now maybe we could work together in peace. She even went back to calling me “Az-chan”, something she’d done before the war started.
As the weekend came, I had a lot to think about. Despite my recent misery, there were a lot of reasons to keep the job. Financially, I was most certainly in no position to quit, with the wedding already taking a major toll on my back account. I knew from experience that this time wasn’t any good for job hunting. Aside from the president and supervisor, I liked all my other coworkers a lot. I was completely fine with the content of the job as well. If the president and supervisor could actually change, then why shouldn’t I keep working? I wasn’t thinking about long-term, but I could at least stick to the original plan of working until the end of my contract in January. The job market would be much better, hopefully financially I’d be better prepared, and I could also search for new jobs while still working.
I see-sawed quite a bit, but going into Monday I was leaning towards keeping the job. I decided not to volunteer that information – if they were serious about wanting to keep me, they’d have to come and ask. Monday came and went with no talk of what I’d decided. By the weekly meeting on Tuesday afternoon, my decision still had not been addressed. Which was a good thing, because it was about to change.
To start off the meeting, Doris asked our computer programmer about something customer service related. We’d recently renewed the website and the internal systems. Overall, things would work for the better/more smoothly, but for now there were still a lot of bugs and kinks to iron out. A certain automated daily report that the customer service department used to get wasn’t being processed. Doris noted that it’d been over a month since she’d asked about it, but they still didn’t have it.
It’s important to remind our readers here that we only had one computer programmer. Again, for a business that operates solely on the web, you would assume there’d be a team of programmers, but no. Just one guy.
He tells Doris that he hasn’t forgotten about her request, but it’s just been queued among a billion other things that has to be done. And there were a lot of things that were much higher priority that had to be taken care of first. Doris accepted this answer, but the supervisor, perhaps sensing blood, took this opportunity to pounce on the programmer for – wait for it – not doing his job. She says that even if he can’t do the task, the least he could do is update Doris on the timeframe or give her a progress report. The president started to get in on it as well, accusing him of making the same mistakes he did at his last company.
The programmer is a very short-tempered Japanese guy. He’s been known to snap at food servers for not responding to table calls fast enough. I don’t know about everyone else at the meeting, but I was thinking that he was showing incredible restraint for simply taking the dressing-down from both the president and supervisor without snapping back. He did make one mistake though. The president said something, and the programmer responded back with “Isn’t that just your way of thinking?” The key word here is “you”. As some of you may know, Japanese as a language has many different levels of politeness. The programmer used a word for you that wasn’t very polite, and in some cases would be considered rude (for you Japanese speakers/scholars out there, he said “omae”). It’s certainly not a word you would use to address a boss.
Well, the president flips out at this point. “What’d you call me? What’d you call me?” He just starts laying into the guy, and this continues for a few minutes. Needless to say, it was extremely awkward for everyone else sitting there – at least 10 other employees, not to mention the 5-6 people who weren’t actually a part of the meeting but were within earshot.
After a few minutes, even the supervisor is feeling that this is excessive. When she finds an opening, she jumps in and gets the meeting back on track. But the president was far from done. At one point in the middle of the meeting, he starts up again! “You know what I really like about Korea?” he says. “They have well-defined levels of politeness, and they treat the people above them with proper respect. Isn’t that right?” he says to the Korean guy. The Korean guy is good friends with the programmer, and regardless of that, anyone in that situation would want to deflect as much as possible, which is what he did. “Well, I can’t speak for all of Korea,” and “Well, there’s lots of different situations…” he’d repeat as the president continued to pressure him to confirm Korea’s “outstanding” social levels. “Ah, okay, you don’t want to be dragged into this. I understand,” the president says, and continues to lay into the programmer, saying things like he’s “raising him to be a productive member of society” and he should be respected like a father.
The supervisor jumps in again and gets the meeting back on track. We finish all the issues on the table and everyone starts to pack up their things in anticipation of a conclusion. However, the president is still not done. Literally, people starting to make getting-up motions and he starts in again on the computer programmer guy. “I think you should write a 2-page essay on the importance of good manners in society,” he says. The programmer has just about had it at this point. “I don’t think I have to do that,” he says. “Sure you do,” the president fires back. “No I don’t,” the programmer responds. “And why not?” “Because I’m quitting. Please stay after the meeting so we can talk about my terms.” With everyone else finally set free from that spectacle, the programmer, supervisor, and president stayed behind and the programmer kept true to his word, setting his final work date for the end of September.
Seeing what happened in the meeting more or less confirmed for me that I was done as well. The president had promised to change things, but that day I simply did not see him having a capacity for change. Before he could fix the issues, he had to fix the source of the problem. And I just didn’t see that happening – he didn’t even seem aware there was a problem. It was all of us who were wrong, and only he who was right. If I’d stayed, maybe things would be okay for a little while, but I saw things invariably inverting back to the way they were. It was best to get out now while I had the chance. Later that day, I drafted up my response email where I confirmed that my last day of work would be the end of the month.
This feels like a place where I would write a conclusion to this saga…but as you all know, we’re not done yet. Stay tuned for Part VIII.

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56 Responses

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  1. Jon said, on November 10, 2008 at 11:27 pm

    Thanks for the write-up Az, your entries always put my own problems in to perspective and I appreciate my current situation just a little more =)

  2. Legal said, on November 10, 2008 at 11:44 pm

    You really are a very talented writer. I’ve heard and read of several stories very similar to your own, but yours is the most interesting by far simply because of your writing style.
    Thanks for sharing your experiences.

  3. Tkosam said, on November 10, 2008 at 11:53 pm

    Sorry about the last comment in the last post. I like how how this lead you to finally make your decision. Can you update us, did the Programmer find a better job or at least one that he is happier with??
    I really liked how he used “お前” :D

  4. Anonymous said, on November 11, 2008 at 12:06 am

    So what did your parents say about all this? Or did I miss that part?

  5. Anonymous said, on November 11, 2008 at 12:06 am

    So what did your parents say about all this? Or did I miss that part?

  6. Draglancer said, on November 11, 2008 at 12:16 am

    Good God, an 8th part? You’re getting longer than some of those Korean Dramas.. :O I hope things smooth out soon in your stories..

  7. yawmoght said, on November 11, 2008 at 12:20 am

    Thank you for telling us all this, Az! As said above, you are a talented writer and a good story-teller.
    And you have all our support!

  8. Xei said, on November 11, 2008 at 1:14 am

    It’s things like these that make me hesitate going into the workforce again. Granted, I’m 17 already and I need to do so to live, but I experienced it once and I don’t want it to happen again =\
    My experience is something similar to yours, and that’s why I keep coming back and reading your entries =)

  9. Jon said, on November 11, 2008 at 1:15 am

    I’ve enjoyed following along with your story. Looking forward to the ending.

  10. Jack said, on November 11, 2008 at 1:18 am

    Not much of a condolence coming from the internet, but we feel for you man. Seeing as how you now have the time to post these articles up, I’m guessing that you are still having some trouble looking for a job? Well, good luck to you and your wife (to be?). As a famous chinese saying goes, good endings befall good people.

  11. Gino said, on November 11, 2008 at 1:25 am

    Hey Az, perhaps you or someone else reading these comments can help me out here. Currently I’m a senior in college at Loyola University. I’m working part time at a Sushi restaurant. The two owners (married to one another) are Japanese, with the wife being kinda crazy. My direct boss though is Chinese, and a very dear sweet woman. Anyways, recently I became sick to a sinus infection, and found out I was allergic to the medication I received, and unfortunately I found this out during work. I had to leave early, and the next day a co worker came in to fill in for me. The following weekend I already had off for religious reasons. Anyways, lately I get the sense that they have been passive aggressive, even though I seemed to be one of the most well liked workers in the entire restaurant. Is there any way to tell if they are harboring ill intent towards me at all? I get a lot of mixed signals, and nobody seems to know what to make of their behavior.
    damn that was a lot longer than I thought it would be. Though to be honest, I’ve been a fan of yours since the beginning.

  12. Mode said, on November 11, 2008 at 1:28 am

    I think you have a natural flair for comedic timing and delivery. Well this whole blog is a testament to that, but take this Sour Apple series as an example. The entirety of this post and previous ones have been pretty sombre and very effective(fuck, i was getting pissed off and frustrated just READING it). But when you make a self-referential quip to previous posts like the last sentence in this one, it’s like catharsis and I just break out into a laugh. Just wondering… do you do that intentionally or is it just that it happened to be there?

  13. Anonymous said, on November 11, 2008 at 1:48 am

    so much misery!!! it never ends!!!

  14. Anonymous said, on November 11, 2008 at 1:48 am

    so much misery!!! it never ends!!!

  15. McGee said, on November 11, 2008 at 2:39 am

    Damn Az, We are getting frequent updates more than ever.
    Your zeal for writing the Sour Apples Saga makes me think you’re some kind of masochist rellishing your past pain.
    Or maybe you want a shoulder to cry on?

  16. code monkey said, on November 11, 2008 at 3:21 am

    Coming from a similarly-cultured company,I’m actually not surprised by their responses. Appalled, yes but not surprised. I still, however, look forward to the upcoming installments.
    I empathize with you and your former colleagues.

  17. Kyle E said, on November 11, 2008 at 3:53 am

    Heh I just put in my application for a year long study abroad program in Japan. What am I getting myself into haha. But damn man that’s one doozy (how do you spell that anyway) of a story

  18. Gordon said, on November 11, 2008 at 4:43 am

    Well, at least it doesn’t say the worst is yet to come this time!

  19. Mos said, on November 11, 2008 at 4:51 am

    Az, I think you should seriously consider becoming a writer or find a job in a magazine/newspaper, You’re not the typical blogger, your writing abilities are amazing, look at your audience if you ever doubt yourself.

  20. Ken said, on November 11, 2008 at 5:05 am

    Where does he live? Buy me a box of 12.7x99mm / .50BMG sniper rounds and I’ll take care of him.

  21. Justin said, on November 11, 2008 at 5:22 am

    Az, If you wrote and published a book, I would buy it.

  22. Christopher Mohr said, on November 11, 2008 at 5:32 am

    I think this is the longest work related gripe I’ve ever read. And the style and substance are both so compelling. It’s a great piece of work you do.
    condolences on the bad job, but hopefully you’ll find something else soon. If nothing else, there’s always eikaiwa…

  23. greg said, on November 11, 2008 at 7:15 am

    7 entries in 14 days! You are on fire Az!!
    Hope you fund another job

  24. DK said, on November 11, 2008 at 8:33 am

    If you don’t mind me saying Az, I can almost see your whole life story there in Japan as one huge anime…
    Seriously… I can draw up a storyboard right about now if I only got a draft of your final chapter of “Sour Apples”-arc!
    At least the Supervisor sorta kept her promise of cooling down. But that F*CKING president is just a plain asshole. Have you sued his ass to the ground yet…?

  25. Anonymous said, on November 11, 2008 at 9:25 am

    You know, I’d love to read the personal blog account of a certain computer programmer and his job working as the only programmer for an online add company
    He sounds like he’d have an interesting spitfire perspective
    And when I read ‘omae’ I gasped, then burst out laughing. Awesomeness!

  26. Anonymous said, on November 11, 2008 at 9:25 am

    You know, I’d love to read the personal blog account of a certain computer programmer and his job working as the only programmer for an online add company
    He sounds like he’d have an interesting spitfire perspective
    And when I read ‘omae’ I gasped, then burst out laughing. Awesomeness!

  27. Sean said, on November 11, 2008 at 12:11 pm

    Unlike other readers, I’m not really into this story. I read it, but it’s too “real.” Makes it boring and dull, you know. The observations don’t rise above the matter…perhaps its too personal. Sounds more like a journal than a “story”…but don’t mind me, I still read it, right?
    But the important thing is: when are the photo’s coming, man? It’s been two months! It must be the Japanese take their time in dark rooms smoothing every negative pixel

  28. Onyx said, on November 11, 2008 at 12:25 pm

    LOL u gotta give it to the programmer for standing up to the president. When you mention the word “you” i already figured he used “omae” lol. He was just returning the belittling nature he had to endure for however long, i just hope that job wasn’t his bread n butter.

  29. Anonymous said, on November 11, 2008 at 12:32 pm

    wowwwwww
    what a story
    I do have to kinda pat myself on the back for alluding earlier that the boss may have been thinking he was ‘grooming you’
    This is just a classic story of a communication breakdown and different approaches not working together.
    The president’s approach really needs to change if he wants to change his turnover rate.
    Now there’s a business for you, go back to consult for him on employee retention.

  30. Anonymous said, on November 11, 2008 at 12:32 pm

    wowwwwww
    what a story
    I do have to kinda pat myself on the back for alluding earlier that the boss may have been thinking he was ‘grooming you’
    This is just a classic story of a communication breakdown and different approaches not working together.
    The president’s approach really needs to change if he wants to change his turnover rate.
    Now there’s a business for you, go back to consult for him on employee retention.

  31. Anonymous said, on November 11, 2008 at 12:36 pm

    Gino I would guess (complete guess, though no experience) that some kind of thank you gesture to tell the person who covered for you and to the owners for putting up with the trouble and that you feel much better now might help?
    Maybe some Hallmark-card type thing?

  32. Anonymous said, on November 11, 2008 at 12:36 pm

    Gino I would guess (complete guess, though no experience) that some kind of thank you gesture to tell the person who covered for you and to the owners for putting up with the trouble and that you feel much better now might help?
    Maybe some Hallmark-card type thing?

  33. Mike said, on November 11, 2008 at 12:58 pm

    Damn Az, sounds like working for a japanese company is rough. I hope this is not a representation of the majority, I am moving there next year O_O

  34. Anonymous said, on November 11, 2008 at 1:14 pm

    VIII parts? Wow this is much more epic than I’d expected… bonus points if you can beat FF and make it to XIV!
    Seriously though, this is making for one hell of a read and I’m really enjoying these shorter punchier entries. This really is a story worth telling and worth hearing, although I can understand why you were reluctant to do so.

  35. Anonymous said, on November 11, 2008 at 2:39 pm

    D’ah! Again with the cliffhangers!

  36. Ben said, on November 11, 2008 at 3:34 pm

    ただお前の考え方だよね。

  37. Blues said, on November 11, 2008 at 4:24 pm

    Someone mentioned a good idea. I don’t know how the japanese work but you don’t even need a journalism degree to enter the news industry. Though you start out very lowly, and its super tough. And you do have a degree in something(at least) and foriegn language skills.

  38. mr. who said, on November 11, 2008 at 4:30 pm

    geez this is beginning to look like a naruto story arc…

  39. John U. said, on November 11, 2008 at 5:35 pm

    I really hope this story ends with you founding the first Japanese charter of Fight Club.

  40. John smith said, on November 11, 2008 at 6:18 pm

    I agree with your mentality. However, as you said it may have gotten better for a little while then relapsed, but I believe you had 6 months left? which is not all that long in my opinion. a very tough call at the time.
    But seeing how vindictive and unwilling the boss was to let things go, I would assume he would try to get revenge somehow. I believe he did from your other postings but hindsight is also 20/20.

  41. Jane said, on November 11, 2008 at 6:48 pm

    This is like the Odyssey of shitty work stories. I can’t believe how unreasonable people in positions of authority can be… On the plus side, your next job is almost certain to be better, right?

  42. noot said, on November 11, 2008 at 8:12 pm

    i dont know, i feel a bit guilty about this story, i gave a donation for it, and i really didnt mind not reading it (i was rather waiting for wedding photo news…and maybe even a hello from your wife to your dedicated fans). I’ve been through something similar (actually worse….the entire department got shut down because of it lol), and i feel just wrong, reading these torturous lines. Its agony!
    Because you are writing and publishing it, i’ll read it. But please accept apology for ever donating. This is not something i’d ever want to pay for you to write about. And you shouldnt feel pressured by money (or anything else), to write about something like this.

  43. Anonymous said, on November 11, 2008 at 9:04 pm

    Attention readers:
    What the programmer actually said was “omae wa mo shindeiru”. Which explains why Az no longer works there.

  44. Anonymous said, on November 11, 2008 at 9:04 pm

    Attention readers:
    What the programmer actually said was “omae wa mo shindeiru”. Which explains why Az no longer works there.

  45. John said, on November 12, 2008 at 2:00 am

    DAH! Someone beat me to an FF reference!
    I’m glad you stuck to your guns and didn’t bend to the will of assholes. I don’t think your wife realizes the trench warfare that was your workplace. This is one more fan saying 頑張れ!

  46. yesman said, on November 12, 2008 at 4:16 am

    I agree with Jon,this is the best blog.

  47. Boggsley said, on November 12, 2008 at 7:12 am

    Been reading your blog for a while- I’ve read every entry so far and I think you’re one hilarious dude. I’m sorry that you’ve had to go through this once; awkward work environments with idiot bosses are universal, I think. And I have mucho respect for you for dredging up the memories to go over it a second time although now knowing how bad this situation was I feel guilty for reading it, lol.
    Anyway, good job.

  48. Fëaluinix said, on November 12, 2008 at 8:44 am

    In part VIII, we learn that Az’s boss is really his father, shortly after he chops off his arm with a lightsaber…
    Also the supervisor is his sister. And the boss as a young man personally assembled Az’s first Playstation.

  49. Nii said, on November 12, 2008 at 10:13 am

    Awesome. So this company no longer has a web designer/programmer at all!

  50. Amanda said, on November 12, 2008 at 12:48 pm

    I wonder what the reaction would’ve been if he’d used “kisama” instead? ^_^;

  51. Zantetsu said, on November 12, 2008 at 3:55 pm

    Good lord, that programmer is my hero. Way to go out with a bang if you ask me, the president deserved it.

  52. Justin said, on November 13, 2008 at 1:37 am

    I know its bad to think this way, but I secretly hope the company folds so this f-tard of a president will perhaps learn a lesson in life and business.

  53. Steeple said, on November 13, 2008 at 1:53 am

    Nii> I’d say he’d shove a Kamehameha up the programmer’s ass. For a moment, I thought it was “temee”, but then I came to my senses.
    Az, I must say, along with everyone else, that it sucks bigtime that you had to go through all this shit. Hopefully it’ll turn into a story you bitch about to your buddies.

  54. Jazzorion said, on November 13, 2008 at 2:47 am

    “I don’t think I have to do that,” he says. “Sure you do,” the president fires back. “No I don’t,” the programmer responds. “And why not?” “Because I’m quitting. Please stay after the meeting so we can talk about my terms.”
    I “OH SNAP”ed at that part XD. Yeah the president definitely has issues. Shouldn’t he have thought about what he was doing before he started going off on his ONLY programmer? I would’ve walked out too.

  55. Nuke said, on November 14, 2008 at 10:02 pm

    In these “Sour Apples” post, I’m noticing some issues. Az, you have valid points about the negative work environment. However, in here, you are saying “My company’s policy on how to do the job don’t work, I’ll make my own policy”.
    REVEL anytime a supervisor wants to give his blessings on your actions. From that point on (especially if in writing or e-mail), they take on responsibility of outcome. The instant YOU decide to make decisions out of the loop, it falls on you when fails, but you get no credit if it works.
    Overtime: make it a point to get your boss’s permission and record your overtime. Yeah, you’re not paid for it, but it creates a boss in the loop and boss is accountable for outcome. Policies slowing down your workload, inform them and record it. Want to take on more work like you did last year, make the request like you did.
    The instant you start doing things on your own, the instant you start thinking “it’s not going to change things”, the instant you take the verifiable blame from your supervisors is when the weight gets more and more on your shoulders with no benefit.
    If you’re not paid to make a decision, don’t bother making a decision. Make your supervisor’s earn their pay. Again, it’s best if by e-mail so there’s verifiable proof.
    That said, it seems you still worked in a shitty place for contract work. But I get the feeling from your posts some of it is you doing your own thing.

  56. Nuke said, on November 14, 2008 at 10:17 pm

    Thank the gods you didn’t succumb to the battered wife syndrome. You decide to leave. Then Bossman was getting all lovey dovey on you. Getting you drunk and wet. You start thinking you need him more than your dignity. Then BAMM!, you see him hitting his other girlfriends. So one lady, uhh, woman up to him and his BS.
    I know I replied about work ethic earlier (concerning giving supervisors their responsibility).
    Funny thing is, this president losing his lead (only) programmer and lead English director is bound to have issues. Now I wonder how the economy slump the next month affected all this. I’m all excited.


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